Nuclear Emergency Preparedness

This information is provided to ensure that the public is aware of what they should do in the unlikely event of an emergency at one of Dominion's nuclear power stations.

General Information

Radiation Protection

Although you cannot see or smell radiation, it can be detected, accurately and easily, with the aid of instruments designed for that purpose. Trained technicians using these instruments monitor radiation in and around the nuclear power station. Should a nuclear incident occur, this monitoring will be increased to obtain accurate information for all areas that might be affected. State health officials will evaluate this information and advise what actions should be taken.

What is radiation?

There is nothing new or mysterious about radiation. It has always been a part of our natural environment. We are constantly exposed to radiation from the sun and outer space. Naturally occurring radioactive materials are present in the earth around us, in the buildings we live and work in, and in the food and water we consume. (> Learn more about radiation.)

Nuclear power as a source of radiation

The fission process which takes place in a nuclear power station is a source of man-made radiation, although in normal operations the amount reaching the environment is almost insignificant. The average person receives approximately 350 millirem* per year from natural and man-made sources, and a person living within 10 miles of a nuclear generating station receives less than one millirem each year from the station.

Nuclear power stations are designed and built to prevent radioactivity from reaching the environment, both during normal operation and in the event of an accident. These intensive efforts by the industry have worked in the more than 30 years of nuclear power production in this country. Not a single death or serious injury from radiation has ever been recorded involving a member of the public. The likelihood of such an occurrence in the future is extremely small.

The effect radiation from any source has on us depends upon the type and force of the rays and particles and the exposure to our bodies. Therefore, the protective actions described in this web site are important to remember in the event of an emergency.

Radiation Sources

Learn about sources of radiation from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has defined four classes of emergencies for nuclear power stations:

Notifications of Unusual Events

A minor problem has taken place. No release of radioactive matter is expected. Federal, state and city/county officials will be kept informed.

Alert

A minor problem has occurred. Small amounts of radioactive matter could be released inside the station. All state and local officials will be informed and will be asked to stand by. It is not likely that the public will have to do anything.

Site Area Emergency

A more serious problem has occurred. Small amounts of radioactive matter could be released into the area right around the station. If the public needs to be alerted, sirens will be sounded. Turn to your EAS radio or television stations for more information. All appropriate officials will be informed and ready to help you if needed.

General Emergency

This is the most serious kind of problem. Radioactive matter could be released outside the station site. The public may have to be protected. The sirens will be sounded to alert the public of the problem. Turn to EAS radio or television stations for information on actions that may need to be taken. Officials will be fully informed and will tell the public what to do.

Background radiation is the radioactivity that occurs naturally in our environment. The level of background radiation in mid-Atlantic region is about 100 millirem per year.

Millirem is a unit used to measure radiation dosage. It is 1/1000 of a rem. A rem is also a unit used to measure radiation dosage. A rem also relates to the potential effect of radiation on human cells.

Nuclear Regulatory Commission is the federal agency responsible for the regulation and inspection of nuclear power stations to assure safety.

Radiation is energy given off in the form of waves or particles. The term "radiation" is broad and includes ordinary sunlight and radio waves, but more often it is used to mean "ionizing" radiation. Ionizing radiation can produce charged particles in materials that it strikes, including living matter. The most common types of ionizing radiation are alpha, beta and gamma.

  • Alpha radiation is the least penetrating type. It can be stopped with a sheet of paper.
  • Beta radiation is emitted from the nucleus of an atom during fission. Beta radiation consists of electrons that can be stopped by thin cardboard.
  • Gamma radiation is electro-magnetic waves emitted from the nucleus of an atom and is essentially the same as X-rays. It can be stopped by heavy shielding such as concrete or lead.

U.S. nuclear power stations, including Dominion’s four stations, are built to seismic standards for their regions and safety systems designed to those standards would direct operators to shut down the reactors in the event of a major earthquake such as the one that struck Japan in the spring of 2011. Additional information is available from the Nuclear Energy Institute.

To receive information on radiation protection, nuclear power or emergency preparedness, please call Dominion Generation at (800) 814-8262 or write to:

Dominion Generation
Innsbrook Technical Center
Nuclear Emergency Preparedness
5000 Dominion Boulevard
Glen Allen, Virginia 23060

or

Commonwealth of Virginia
Department of Emergency Management
Preparedness and Mitigation Division
10501 Trade Court
Richmond, Virginia 23236-3713

For additional local information, please contact the local Emergency Management Coordinator/Official for your jurisdiction.

Station Information

This information is part of emergency planning efforts developed by Dominion, the Commonwealth of Virginia Department of Emergency Management, and the counties and cities near Surry Power Station.

The state and communities located within 10 miles of a nuclear power station have prepared emergency response plans. These plans provide guidelines to the state and local government organizations which ensure effective direction and control in a nuclear emergency. The plans include procedures for warning the public and for taking protective actions, such as sheltering or evacuation, in the event of a nuclear emergency.

Contact your local Emergency Management Coordinator/Official if you have any questions.


Emergency Notifications

Local radio and TV stations
When sirens sound, find a local radio or TV station that is broadcasting emergency information. Emergency officials will provide critical instructions in an emergency, such as evacuation orders or how to safely stay where you are. The event may affect each area differently, so listen carefully for instruction and guidance specific to your location.

Emergency Contacts
Program emergency numbers into your mobile phone and post by each land-line phone (police, fire, your physician, etc.). Develop a list of out-of-town relatives or friends and their telephone numbers. Ask one of them to serve as a primary contact. Family members should contact this person since it is often easier to call long distance or send a text message after a disaster.

Pets
Guide dogs and other service animals are the only pets allowed in Evacuation Assembly Centers. Talk to your veterinarian or local humane society in advance about an emergency plan for your pets.

Livestock and Crops
You should plan to shelter farm animals in an emergency, and have a relocation plan in the event that you cannot return to your home. Provide livestock with stored feed and water for at least three days. Close all windows and doors to livestock shelters where possible. Please inform EAC personnel if you have left livestock sheltered at your residence. Federal, state and local officials will check farm animals and crops for contamination. Decontamination of animals may be necessary for your safety and that of your animals. Contact your local cooperative extension agent or emergency management office for more details. More information about disaster planning for pets and livestock is available at FEMA’s website,www.ready.gov/caring-animals

Special Needs

Individuals who have special needs should contact their local emergency management office now to learn what evacuation options are available. If you have been provided with an Emergency Planning calendar from Dominion, use the “Special Assistance Needed” card located at the back of the calendar to alert emergency responders about your situation during an emergency. Additional information on disaster preparedness planning for people with disabilities is available at www.ReadyVirginia.gov.

Schools
In an emergency, officials will advise school administrators and those that have students living within 10 miles of the station. Listen to local media for updates on school status and whether your children will take shelter at school or be transported to another location. Contact your child’s school before an emergency occurs to learn how school officials will notify you of your child’s status. Under no circumstances will students who live within the 10-mile EPZ be sent home or released without a parent or guardian.


Sirens/Emergency Alert System (EAS)

In addition to listening for local, up-to-date emergency information on radio and TV stations, emergency officials have installed early warning sirens throughout the 10-mile area surrounding the power station. These sirens alert the public in the event of a General Emergency at Surry Power Station. Dominion tests these sirens on a quarterly basis and announces the tests through the local media (tests are typically on the second Wednesday of March, June, September and December).

Actual Emergency
For an actual emergency, the sirens will sound over a period of 15 minutes. The signal will be a series of four three-minute siren tones with a minute of silence between them. When the siren sounds, find a local radio or TV station that is broadcasting emergency information and listen for instructions. Call your neighbors, especially the elderly or those who have difficulty hearing or seeing. Make sure that they have received the warning and know what to do.

Siren Tests
The test signal for the siren is a three-minute steady tone. The alerting signal for an actual emergency will be four separate three-minute siren tones with one minute of silence between each one.

Unscheduled Siren
If you hear a siren that is not a scheduled quarterly test, find a local radio or TV station that is broadcasting emergency information and listen for instructions or contact your local emergency management office. Do not call 911.

Note: If siren alerting is not available in your area, local law enforcement officials will use emergency service vehicles equipped with public address systems to alert residents. Once you have been alerted, find a local radio or television station that is broadcasting emergency information and listen for instructions.

In an emergency, officials will also assess the potential impacts for areas beyond the 10-mile zone and notify those residents of any necessary protective actions.


Stay Where You Are vs. Evacuate

When emergency officials alert you to an emergency, they will give instructions about staying safely where you are or evacuating.

Monitor and Prepare: If you are ordered to go inside and stay inside, go into the nearest building and lock all windows and doors. Remain inside until emergency officials tell you it is safe for you to leave.

  • Tune to a local radio or television station for additional information.

If you are ordered to shelter in place, this means to go inside and stay there until emergency officials tell you it is safe for you to leave. By sheltering in place, you reduce the exposure you receive from a potential radiological release.

  • Use your family emergency plan.
  • Tune to a local radio or television station for additional information.
  • Stay indoors and close all windows, doors, vents and fireplace dampers.
  • Turn off all devices that draw in outside air, such as air conditioners, heat pumps and fans.
  • Locate your disaster supply kit. Make sure you have a three-day supply of water and food that will not spoil.
  • Do not use the telephone unless it is absolutely necessary. Use phone lines for emergency communication only.
  • If you received an Emergency Planning Calendar from Dominion, place the “We Have Been Notified” card from the calendar in your window or doorway facing the road. This will tell emergency responders that you are aware of the event and following instructions. The card should be visible from the roadway at or near your front entrance.

If your Protective Action Zone is ordered to evacuate, leave immediately.

  • Use your family emergency plan, including the plan you have made for your pets.
  • Call your family contact.
  • Review your evacuation route to your designated Evacuation Assembly Center.
  • Tune to a local radio or television station for further instructions.
  • Plan to be away from home for at least three days.
  • Take your disaster supply kit.

Before you leave:

  • Turn off or close all devices that draw in outside air (air conditioners, heat pumps, fans, fireplace dampers).
  • Turn off all lights and electrical appliances (except your refrigerator/freezer).
  • Close and lock all windows and doors.
  • If you have special needs, place the “Special Assistance Needed” card from your Dominion Emergency Planning calendar in your window or doorway facing the road. This will tell emergency responders that you cannot evacuate or that you need medical help. The card should be visible from the roadway at or near your front entrance.

In the car (outdoors):

  • Close all windows and air vents in your vehicle.
  • Shut off your vehicle air conditioner or heater.
  • Follow the directions of law enforcement and traffic control personnel stationed along the evacuation route to direct you to the nearest EAC.


Evacuation Details

Protective Action Zones (PAZ)

Protective Action Zones have been established within 10 miles of the power station to help notify the public about what they need to do in an emergency. Natural boundaries (rivers, lakes, tributaries, etc.) or man-made geographic features (roadways or county lines) mark each zone. Each zone is assigned a number on the map.

Please take the time to identify the PAZ where you work or live. If you have any problem determining which zone you live in, or need additional information, please contact your local Emergency Management Coordinator/Official. Numbers are also provided below.

Jurisdictions Within 50 Miles

If an accident were to occur at Surry, the area within 50 miles of the station would be assessed to determine if there has been any impact on the environment. If there is any impact, the public in the affected area would be notified. If any actions are necessary, the public would be informed of such actions to be taken.

Evacuation Assembly Centers (EAC)

Evacuation Assembly Centers (EAC) are public shelters that offer food, clothing and decontamination if necessary. It is important that you report to your EAC if ordered to do so. At the EAC, officials will monitor you for contamination and perform decontamination procedures if necessary. A list of EACs, directions and the best routes to leave the area are provided on our PAZ and EAC webpage.

An evacuation order might include all or just a portion of the 10-mile zone around the Surry Power Station. Familiarize yourself with the routes indicated on your map and highlight these routes if you print a copy. When you drive on these roads, make a mental note that you might use them in an evacuation, and write down the directions to your EAC.

EAC Locations:

Isle of Wight County

  • Smithfield Middle School
    14175 Turner Drive
    Smithfield, VA 23230

James City County

  • Charles City County School Complex
    10039 Courthouse Road
    Charles City, VA 23020
  • Hampton Coliseum
    1000 Coliseum Drive
    Hampton, VA 23666

Surry County

  • L.P. Jackson Middle School
    4255 New Design Road
    Dendron, VA 23839

York County

  • Grafton School Complex
    405 Grafton Drive
    Yorktown, VA 23692
  • Tabb High School
    4431 Big Bethel Road
    Yorktown, VA 23693
  • Poquoson High School
    51 Odd Road
    Poquoson, VA 23662
  • New Kent County High School
    7365 Egypt Road
    New Kent, VA 23124

City of Newport News

  • Warwick High School
    51 Copeland Lane
    Newport News, VA 23601
  • Hines Middle School
    561 McLawhorne Drive
    Newport News, VA 23601
  • Gildersleeve Middle School
    1 Minton Drive
    Newport News, VA 23606

City of Williamsburg

  • New Kent County High School
    7365 Egypt Road
    New Kent, VA 23124

Note: In an actual emergency, it is possible that not all Protective Action Zones need to evacuate. Listen carefully to instructions specific to your area.


Local Radio and Television Stations

When sirens sound, find a local radio or TV station that is broadcasting emergency information. Emergency officials will provide critical instructions in an emergency, such as evacuation orders or how to safely stay where you are. The event may affect each area differently, so listen carefully for instruction and guidance specific to your location. 

Emergency Alert System Radio Stations

WRVA 1140 AM Richmond
WRXL 102.1 FM Richmond
WRNL 910 AM Richmond
WRVQ 94.5 FM Richmond
WGH 1310 AM Newport News
WGH 97.3 FM Newport News
WHRV 89.5 FM Norfolk
WHRO 90.3 FM Norfolk
WXGM 99.1 FM Gloucester
WAFX 106.9 FM Eastern Virginia

Emergency Alert System TV Stations

WTVR Channel 6 Richmond
WRIC Channel 8 Richmond
WWBT Channel 12 Richmond
WTKR Channel 3 Norfolk
WHRO Channel 15 Norfolk
WVEC Channel 13 Norfolk
WVBT Channel 43 Portsmouth
WAVY Channel 10 Portsmouth
WBNT Channel 27 Portsmouth
Channel 46 York County
Channel 48 Fort Eustis*

*Note: Fort Eustis monitor command Channel 48. For radiological information relating to Surry Power Station, tune in to one of the local broadcasting stations listed above.


Emergency Management Coordinator/Official

  • Isle of Wight County:  757-365-6308, 24-hour number 757-357-2151
  • James City County:  757-564-2140, 24-hour number 757-566-0112
  • Surry County:  757-294-5271, 24-hour number 757-294-5264
  • York County: 757-890-3600, 24-hour number 757-890-3621
  • City of Newport News: 757-269-2900, 24-hour number 757-247-2500
  • City of Williamsburg: 757-220-6225, 24-hour number 757-890-3621

The Virginia Department of Emergency Management

211 - Virginia

Call 211 Virginia for information about school closures, Evacuation Assembly Centers, Disaster Preparedness and other emergency topics.

  • Write to: Virginia Department of Emergency Management,10501 Trade Court,Richmond, VA 23236-3713


More Information

Visit the Surry Power Station Information Center to learn more about nuclear energy firsthand. To assist us in accommodating you with special requirements or needs, we ask that you contact us in advance by calling 757-357-5410. For more information about nuclear power station operations and preparedness, you can also call Dominion toll-free: 800-814-8262.

In addition to the information presented about Surry Power Station on this web site, you can send mail to:

Dominion
Nuclear Emergency Preparedness
Innsbrook Technical Center
5000 Dominion Boulevard
Glen Allen, VA 23060

This information is part of emergency planning efforts developed by Dominion, the Commonwealth of Virginia Department of Emergency Management, and the counties and cities near North Anna Power Station.

The state and communities located within 10 miles of a nuclear power station have prepared emergency response plans. These plans provide guidelines to the state and local government organizations which ensure effective direction and control in a nuclear emergency. The plans include procedures for warning the public and for taking protective actions, such as sheltering or evacuation, in the event of a nuclear emergency.

Contact your local Emergency Management Coordinator/Official if you have any questions.


Emergency Notifications

Local radio and TV stations
When sirens sound, find a local radio or TV station that is broadcasting emergency information. Emergency officials will provide critical instructions in an emergency, such as evacuation orders or how to safely stay where you are. The event may affect each area differently, so listen carefully for instruction and guidance specific to your location.

Emergency Contacts
Program emergency numbers into your mobile phone and post by each land-line phone (police, fire, your physician, etc.). Develop a list of out-of-town relatives or friends and their telephone numbers. Ask one of them to serve as a primary contact. Family members should contact this person since it is often easier to call long distance or send a text message after a disaster.

Pets
Guide dogs and other service animals are the only pets allowed in Evacuation Assembly Centers. Talk to your veterinarian or local humane society in advance about an emergency plan for your pets.

Livestock and Crops
You should plan to shelter farm animals in an emergency, and have a relocation plan in the event that you cannot return to your home. Provide livestock with stored feed and water for at least three days. Close all windows and doors to livestock shelters where possible. Please inform EAC personnel if you have left livestock sheltered at your residence. Federal, state and local officials will check farm animals and crops for contamination. Decontamination of animals may be necessary for your safety and that of your animals. Contact your local cooperative extension agent or emergency management office for more details. More information about disaster planning for pets and livestock is available at FEMA’s website,www.ready.gov/caring-animals

Special Needs

Individuals who have special needs should contact their local emergency management office now to learn what evacuation options are available. If you have been provided with an Emergency Planning calendar from Dominion, use the “Special Assistance Needed” card located at the back of the calendar to alert emergency responders about your situation during an emergency. Additional information on disaster preparedness planning for people with disabilities is available at www.ReadyVirginia.gov.

Schools
In an emergency, officials will advise school administrators and those that have students living within 10 miles of the station. Listen to local media for updates on school status and whether your children will take shelter at school or be transported to another location. Contact your child’s school before an emergency occurs to learn how school officials will notify you of your child’s status. Under no circumstances will students who live within the 10-mile EPZ be sent home or released without a parent or guardian.


Sirens/Emergency Alert System (EAS)

In addition to listening for local, up-to-date emergency information on radio and TV stations, emergency officials have installed early warning sirens throughout the 10-mile area surrounding the power station. These sirens alert the public in the event of a General Emergency at the North Anna Nuclear Power Station. Dominion tests these sirens on a quarterly basis and announces the tests through the local media. (They are tested typically on the third Wednesday of February, May, August and November.)

Actual Emergency
For an actual emergency, the sirens will sound over a period of 15 minutes. The signal will be a series of four three-minute siren tones with a minute of silence between them. When the siren sounds, find a local radio or TV station that is broadcasting emergency information and listen for instructions. Call your neighbors, especially the elderly or those who have difficulty hearing or seeing. Make sure that they have received the warning and know what to do.

Siren Tests
The test signal for the siren is a three-minute steady tone. The alerting signal for an actual emergency will be four separate three-minute siren tones with one minute of silence between each one.

Unscheduled Siren
If you hear a siren that is not a scheduled quarterly test, find a local radio or TV station that is broadcasting emergency information and listen for instructions or contact your local emergency management office. Do not call 911.

Note: If siren alerting is not available in your area, local law enforcement officials will use emergency service vehicles equipped with public address systems to alert residents. Once you have been alerted, find a local radio or television station that is broadcasting emergency information and listen for instructions.

In an emergency, officials will also assess the potential impacts for areas beyond the 10-mile zone and notify those residents of any necessary protective actions.


Stay Where You Are vs. Evacuate

When emergency officials alert you to an emergency, they will give instructions about staying safely where you are or evacuating.

Monitor and Prepare: If you are ordered to go inside and stay inside, go into the nearest building and lock all windows and doors. Remain inside until emergency officials tell you it is safe for you to leave.

  • Tune to a local radio or television station for additional information.

If you are ordered to shelter in place, this means to go inside and stay there until emergency officials tell you it is safe for you to leave. By sheltering in place, you reduce the exposure you receive from a potential radiological release.

  • Use your family emergency plan.
  • Tune to a local radio or television station for additional information.
  • Stay indoors and close all windows, doors, vents and fireplace dampers.
  • Turn off all devices that draw in outside air, such as air conditioners, heat pumps and fans.
  • Locate your disaster supply kit. Make sure you have a three-day supply of water and food that will not spoil.
  • Do not use the telephone unless it is absolutely necessary. Use phone lines for emergency communication only.
  • If you received an Emergency Planning Calendar from Dominion, place the “We Have Been Notified” card from the calendar in your window or doorway facing the road. This will tell emergency responders that you are aware of the event and following instructions. The card should be visible from the roadway at or near your front entrance.

If your Protective Action Zone is ordered to evacuate, leave immediately.

  • Use your family emergency plan, including the plan you have made for your pets.
  • Call your family contact.
  • Review your evacuation route to your designated Evacuation Assembly Center.
  • Tune to a local radio or television station for further instructions.
  • Plan to be away from home for at least three days.
  • Take your disaster supply kit.

Before you leave:

  • Turn off or close all devices that draw in outside air (air conditioners, heat pumps, fans, fireplace dampers).
  • Turn off all lights and electrical appliances (except your refrigerator/freezer).
  • Close and lock all windows and doors.
  • If you have special needs, place the “Special Assistance Needed” card from your Dominion Emergency Planning calendar in your window or doorway facing the road. This will tell emergency responders that you cannot evacuate or that you need medical help. The card should be visible from the roadway at or near your front entrance.

In the car (outdoors):

  • Close all windows and air vents in your vehicle.
  • Shut off your vehicle air conditioner or heater.
  • Follow the directions of law enforcement and traffic control personnel stationed along the evacuation route to direct you to the nearest EAC.


Evacuation Details

Protective Action Zones (PAZ)

Protective Action Zones have been established within 10 miles of the power station to help notify the public about what they need to do in an emergency. Natural boundaries (rivers, lakes, tributaries, etc.) or man-made geographic features (roadways or county lines) mark each zone. Each zone is assigned a number on the map.

Please take the time to identify the PAZ where you work or live. If you have any problem determining which zone you live in, or need additional information, please contact your local Emergency Management Coordinator/Official. Numbers are also provided below.

Jurisdictions Within 50 Miles

If an accident were to occur at North Anna, the area within 50 miles of the station would be assessed to determine if there has been any impact on the environment. If there is any impact, the public in the affected area would be notified. If any actions are necessary, the public would be informed of such actions to be taken.

Evacuation Assembly Centers (EAC)

Evacuation Assembly Centers (EAC) are public shelters that offer food, clothing and decontamination if necessary. It is important that you report to your EAC if ordered to do so. At the EAC, officials will monitor you for contamination and perform decontamination procedures if necessary. A list of EACs, directions and the best routes to leave the area are provided on our PAZ and EAC webpage.

An evacuation order might include all or just a portion of the 10-mile zone around the North Anna Power Station. Familiarize yourself with the routes indicated on your map and highlight these routes if you print a copy. When you drive on these roads, make a mental note that you might use them in an evacuation, and write down the directions to your EAC.

EAC Locations:

Caroline County

  • Caroline High School
    19155 Rogers Clark Blvd.
    Milford, VA 22514

  • Caroline Middle School
    13325 Devils Three Jump Road
    Milford, VA 22514

Hanover County

  • Liberty Middle School
    13496 Liberty School Road
    Ashland, VA 23005

Louisa County

  • Moss-Nuckols Elementary School
    2055 Courthouse Road
    Louisa, VA 23093

Spotsylvania County

  • Courtland High School
    6701 Smith Station Road
    Spotsylvania, VA 22553

  • Massaponax High School
    8201 Jefferson Davis Highway
    Fredericksburg, VA 22407

Orange County

  • Prospect Heights Middle School
    200 Dailey Drive
    Orange, VA 22960
Note: In an actual emergency, it is possible that not all Protective Action Zones need to evacuate. Listen carefully to instructions specific to your area.


Local Radio and Television Stations

When sirens sound, find a local radio or TV station that is broadcasting emergency information. Emergency officials will provide critical instructions in an emergency, such as evacuation orders or how to safely stay where you are. The event may affect each area differently, so listen carefully for instruction and guidance specific to your location. 

Emergency Alert System Radio Stations

WRVA 1140 AM Richmond
WRNL 910 AM Richmond
WRVQ 94.5 FM Richmond
WRXL 102.1 FM Richmond
WFLS 93.3 FM Fredericksburg
WBQB 101.5 FM Fredericksburg
WJMA 103.1 FM Culpeper
WDJL 105.5 FM Louisa
WQGT 1700 AM Hanover *
* (County residents only)

Emergency Alert System TV Stations

WTVR (CBS) Ch. 6 Richmond
WRIC (ABC) Ch. 8 Richmond
WWBT (NBC) Ch. 12 Richmond
WVIR (NBC) Ch. 29 Charlottesville
WRC (NBC) Ch. 4 Washington DC
WTTG (FOX) Ch. 5 Washington DC
WJLA (ABC) Ch. 7 Washington DC
WUSA (CBS) Ch. 9 Washington DC
WVIR (NBC) Ch.3 Charlottesville
WVAW (ABC) Ch. 4 Charlottesville
WAHU (FOX) Ch. 9 Charlottesville


Emergency Management Coordinator/Official

  • Caroline County: 804-633-9831 - 24-Hour: 804-633-4357
  • Hanover County: 804-537-6195 - 24-Hour: 804-365-6140
  • Louisa County: 540-967-3491 - 24-Hour: 540-967-1234
  • Orange County: 540-672-1900 - 24-Hour: 540-672-1234
  • Spotsylvania County: 540-507-7900 - 24-Hour: 540-582-7115

The Virginia Department of Emergency Management

211 - Virginia

Call 211 Virginia for information about school closures, Evacuation Assembly Centers, Disaster Preparedness and other emergency topics.

  • Write to: Virginia Department of Emergency Management,10501 Trade Court,Richmond, VA 23236-3713


More Information

Visit the North Anna Power Station Information Center to learn more about nuclear energy firsthand. To assist us in accommodating you with special requirements or needs, we ask that you contact us in advance by calling 540-894-2029. For more information about nuclear power station operations and preparedness, you can also call Dominion toll-free: 800-814-8262.

In addition to the information presented about North Anna Power Station on this web site, you can send mail to:

Dominion
Nuclear Emergency Preparedness
Innsbrook Technical Center
5000 Dominion Boulevard
Glen Allen, VA 23060