Corporate

Reading Our Meter

 

Our electric meter measures your use of electricity in units called kilowatt-hours or kWh. One kWh is 1,000 watts used for one hour (the same as ten 100-watt bulbs left on for one hour).

Types of Meters

Our electric meter measures your use of electricity in units called kilowatt-hours or kWh. One kWh is 1,000 watts used for one hour (the same as ten 100-watt bulbs left on for one hour).

There are two types of residential electric meters. Standard meters usually have five dials. Digital meters have 5 or 6 numbers displaying the meter reading in a digital format. Meter readers use special handheld units to record data.  In some areas, Dominion has installed meters that transmit electricity usage information to specially-equipped company vehicles.

Some residential customers on special rates have a different meter that not only monitors usage, but also collects data in thirty-minute intervals. This device, known as an interval data recorder (IDR), puts a date and time stamp on the data it collects, recording the exact date and time electricity is consumed.  Due to the recent passage of the Energy Act, which resulted in a Daylight Savings Time change in 2007, these meters are being deployed for Time-of-Use (TOU) customers. If you're on a special rate, you can view your meter summary data when you manage your account online.

>> Meter Reading Schedule 

Understanding the Dials on Standard Meters

The dials on the front of an electric meter work like the odometer on your car. When the hand on one dial makes a complete circle, the hand on the dial to its left moves up one number.

The meter has four or five dials with the numbers 0 to 9. The pointers rotate in different directions. Read the dials from left to right. When the pointer is between 0 and 9, the reading would be 9. If the pointer is directly on a number, look at the next dial on the right. If that pointer has not reached 0, the reading of the dial at the left is the lower number. If it has passed 0, the reading is the higher number.

In this example, the meter reads 19666.

Subtract the reading taken on an earlier date--or the reading on your latest bill--from the current reading to get the number of kilowatt hours you've used since the earlier reading. To practice, use the Interactive Meter below.
 

Interactive Electric Meter

With your mouse, position each pointer as they appear on the meter. The meter reading will be shown below.

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